REV 2 Handlebar on Masi. Summer 2011

REV 2 Masi Summer 2011 by domotion2011
REV 2 Masi Summer 2011, a photo by domotion2011 on Flickr.

If I could have one bike for the summer this would be it. Mostly because I like to go greater distances and the Masi can do that and a whole lot more. The criteria for a bike obviously is to be comfortable and have a certain level of performance. Everything in this package is a means to an end for quick urban riding.

The Reynolds 853 steel frame and carbon fork combination is the backbone for an agile bike ride. This urban bike cuts through the fray without an attitude. Quite possibly that 70’s generation of bike rider will see the value in the design.

Fast REV 2 handlebars make anyone a natural climber. The rider does not have to get off the seat to propel themselves on ascents or from a standing start. The hooded levers are in a natural position for riders that want traditional hand placement in addition to the power grip and upright posture. Micro positioning of the rider is a constant. It has much KODO. If you have been reading my previous postings then you are familiar with KODO. This Japanese word means something akin to heartbeat and has also been translated as “soul in motion.”

The patent pending REV 2 handlebar is currently in prototype on the Masi and two other bikes. Suffice to say, bike riding has become a year around activity for family members because of the easy handling in every conceivable road condition. The upright posture transforms stodgy, heavy, and bendy positions into efficient use of both arms and legs. Virtually any signs of rider discomfort associated with flat, static hand grip bars is eliminated.

About the cockpit. Thanks go out to Recycle in Minneapolis for selling the vintage Campy friction shifters  at way below market value. Also, Bike Nashbar for the deep discounted FSA bar. One on One bicycle studio for miscellaneous parts.

Thanks to David C from Dynacraft who encouraged me to patent once he saw the design.

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